Aus tech business produces sweater from organic waste

brett mathews | 31st October 2018

PERTH – Australian tech business Nanollose has announced its first test garment – a 3D knitted sweater made using fibres produced from the fermentation of liquid coconut waste using bacteria. The company, which has a test plant in Indonesia, is seeking to disrupt the traditional rayon fibre production industry with its patented technology which develops fibres from the fermentation of liquid organic wastes – coconuts are one example but the tech is also applicable to other wastes such as beer and molasses. The procedure also claims it has the benefit of avoiding the challenging wood pulp processing.

Nanollose, which has already signed an MOU with Indonesian coconut industry partner, said its latest garment was created using smart 3D sweater-knit technology, with the fibre “performing extremely well and successfully withstanding the industrial manufacturing process.”
Nanollose says it continues to develop a cost- effective, eco-friendly and scalable alternative to trees for the production of cellulose. The business claims its technology could offer a commercially viable, eco-friendly manufacturing solution for the clothing industry.

Furthermore, throughout all steps the fibre, fabric and garment were said to be produced using standard industrial equipment currently used by textile and clothing manufacturers.

Nanollose managing director Alfie Germano said: “This garment represents another world first achievement for the company and takes us a step closer to offering global clothing and textile manufactures with a sustainable fibre alternative. The textile and fashion industry are very sensory and tactile, to them seeing and touching is believing, so having the ability to produce garments will assist in securing commercial and development agreements.

“We now plan on refining our fibre-to- garment manufacturing process by implementing critical learnings uncovered during the process, with work already underway to create a showcase garment for clothing and textile groups.”